Artifact Collection

 

 

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The museum's collection contains numerous African American artifacts from the late 1700s to the late 1900s.  The collection, which encompasses over 25,000 artifacts, will be highlighted throughout this page.  Additional photographs will be added as space permits.

 

All photographic images on this page are the sole property of Middle Passage, Incorporated. These photographs may not be used for commercial dissemination or reproduced without permission from Middle Passage & African American History Museum. 

 

All AP & UPI wire photographs are strictly collected and preserved for a photographic history record of the Civil Rights struggle in the United States.  Middle Passage, Inc. does not own nor do we represent to own the copyright on these photographs.  All newspapers and magazines are strictly collected and preserved for a written historical record of the Civil Rights struggle in the United States.  Middle Passage, Inc. does not own nor do we represent to own the copyright or publication rights on any of these newspapers & magazines.  The below listed photographs are only a photographic representation of  the museum's extensive artifact collection.

 

Civil Rights Artifacts

AP & UPI Photographs
UPI Wire Photo - Bohemia Magazine - Cuba - Birmingham, AL - Integration - 1963
UPI Wire Photo - Bohemia Magazine - Cuba - Atlanta, GA - Freedom Songs - 1964 
AP Wire Photo - Lamar, S.C. - School Integration - 1970
 
General Civil Rights
Jackson, Mississippi - Newspaper - Mar 6, 1956
Arkansas Democrat Newspaper - Negroes Stage "Sit Down" Here - Mar 10, 1960
Unmasking The Civil Rights Bills - Pamphlet - 1964
Selma Times Journal - Voting Rights March - March 8, 1965
Selma Times Journal - Voting Rights March - March 21, 1965
Selma Times Journal - Voting Rights March - March 22, 1965
Segregation Wall Clock - No Negroes Allowed - 1950s
 
Jim Crow

The term "Jim Crow" was originated by Thomas "Daddy" Dartmouth Rice, a  white minstrel show entertainer.  According to some scholars, Rice created the character Jim Crow after observing an an elderly black man singing and dancing while cleaning out the livery stables in Kentucky.   After observing this elderly black man, Rice believed that he could mimic this routine and turn it into a traveling minstrel entertainment show.  Rice would blackened his face with charcoal paste to resemble a black man, and then recreate the routines he had witnessed.  Rice would dance and sing various musical melodies, with the most famous titled – “Jump, Jim Crow!” (Reference “Daddy Rice” artifact).  By the mid-1800s, the character Jim Crow became very stereotypical of black inferiority in the United States.  The term, “Jim Crow” became a term synonymous with segregation, racism and disfranchisement of African Americans in the late nineteenth-century.

"Daddy" Rice, White Minstrel, New York Mirror Reviews Show - Oct 5, 1833
"Daddy" Rice, New York Mirror Reviews Show - Oct 5, 1833 - (Diff View)
Voter Precinct Poll Tax Receipt - Fort Worth, TX - 1904 - Colored Male
Voter Precinct Poll Tax Receipt - Smith County, TX - 1945 - Colored Female
Progressive Presidential Party Pamphlet - "Jim Crow" - 1948
Drumright, Oklahoma - City Ordinances - 1950 - Segregation Laws
Drumright, Oklahoma - City Ordinances - 1950 - Segregation Laws - (Diff View)

During the late 1800s, and into the early to mid-1900s, the definition of "Jim Crow" pushed far beyond segregation and disfranchisement of African Americans.  Commercial and consumer products in the form of trading cards, glassware, music, photographs, postcards as well corporate advertising campaigns depicted African Americans with exaggerated physical characteristics.  The following artifacts reflect how "White America" viewed Africans Americans.

Trading Card - "Ariosa" Coffee Company - "Comfort for One" - Circa 1890s
Postcard -"You Doun Want None of my Lip Hey?" - Circa 1900s
Postcard - Alligator Bait - Pub.: C. T. American Art - Postmarked 1921
Postcard - The Whipping Post, Dover, DE. - Pub.: Louis Kufmann & Sons - Postmarked 1924
Photograph - Golfer Hitting the Ball Off A Child's Head With End Of His Putter  - 1940s
Bar Shot Glasses With Derogatory Caricature of African Americans - Set of Four - Circa 1950s
 
Race Riots
Detroit Riots - Detroit, Michigan
AP Wire Photo - Detroit - Race Rioters Break Store Window - Jun 21, 1943
AP Wire Photo - Detroit - 208th Military Police Race Riot Duty - Jun 22, 1943
AP Wire Photo - Detroit - Federal Troops Bring Peace - Jun 22, 1943
AP Wire Photo - Detroit - Gun Car at Detroit Race Riot - Jun 22, 1943
AP Wire Photo - Detroit - Aldo Trani Held in Riot Slaying - Jul 31, 1943
New York Magazine PM Daily - Detroit, MI - Riots - Jun 23, 1943
Why Race Riots? - Lessons From Detroit - Detroit, MI - Riots - 1944
Life Mag. Detroit Race Riot - Negro Revolt, The Flames Spread - Aug 4, 1967
Springfield Riot - Springfield, Illinois
Pawtucket Times, RI - Springfield Riot - Negroes Attempt to Kill Pickets - Aug 15, 1908
Pawtucket Times, RI - Springfield Riot - Negro Race Riot Near Tomb of Lincoln - Aug 17, 1908
Pawtucket Times, RI - Springfield Riot - Spring Quiet After Bloody Orgy - Aug 18, 1908
Watts Riot - Los Angeles, California
Life Mag. Watts Race Riot - Los Angeles, CA - Aug 27, 1965
General Race Riots
Race Riots Aren't Necessary - Pamphlet - 1945
Black Power Race Riots First Step Toward Total Anarchy - Jul 1967
Blk Power Race Riots First Step Toward Total Anarchy - Jul 1967 - (Diff View)
 
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee - SNCC

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, or SNCC (pronounced "snick"), was founded and established at Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina, on April 16 - 17, 1960.   The organization fought for civil rights of African Americans.

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Button, (SNCC) - 1960s
Two Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Buttons, (SNCC) - 1960s
 
Southern Christian Leadership Conference - SCLC

On February 14, 1957, in New Orleans, LA., the SCLC formerly established its Board of Directors.  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. - President; Dr. Ralph David Abernathy - Financial Secretary-Treasurer; Rev. C. K. Steele - Vice President; Rev. T. J. Jemison - Secretary; and Attorney I. M. Augustine - General Counsel.

Journal - Southern Christian Leadership Conf. - Vol. 1 No.2. - May 1, 1968
Journal - Southern Christian Leadership Conf. - Vol.1 No.2. - (Diff. View)
 
White Citizens' Councils/Pro-Segregation Org.

The White Citizens' Council was established in Greenwood, Mississippi on July 11, 1954, and founded by Robert Patterson of Indianola, Mississippi.  The White Citizens' Council was primarily established due to the United States Supreme Court's decision, Brown vs. Board of Education, on the desegregation of schools.  The White Citizens' Council quickly spread throughout Mississippi and the surrounding southern states.  The Citizens' Council were dedicated to preserving segregation.

the Citizen - Official Journal of the Citizens Councils of America, Jackson, MS - Apr 1964
the Citizen - Official Journal of the Citizens Councils of America, Jackson, MS - Jul/Aug 1964
the Citizen - Official Journal of the Citizens Councils of America, Jackson, MS - Sep 1964
the Citizen - Official Journal of the Citizens Councils of America, Jackson, MS - Apr 1968
the Citizen - Official Journal of the Citizens Councils of America, Jackson, MS - Jun 1968
Mississippi State Association of Citizens Councils, Winona, MS - Black Monday  - Jul 23 1954
MS State Assoc of Citizens' Councils - Winona, MS -Black Monday - Jul 23 1954 - (Diff View)
White Citizens' Council - Mixed School & Mixed Blood - Herbert Ravenel Sass - 1956
White Citizens' Council - Segregation and the South - Tom Brady - October 4, 1957
Arkansas Citizens' Council Advertisement Card - 1958
White Citizens' Council Bumper Sticker - 1960s
White Citizens' Council - "Buy Conservative Records Here" - 1960s
White Citizens' Council Conservative Record - Rebel - Flight NAACP 105 - 1960s
Americans for the Preservation of the White Race - "Membership Form" - Greenville, MS - 1963
Flyer Introducing the Americans for the Preservation of the White Race  - Greenville, MS - 1963
Citizens' Council of Greater New Orleans, LA  "Stop Buying Ford Cars" 1964
Segregation or Death - By John Kasper - 1960s
 
Council of Federated Organizations - COFO

The Council of Federated Organizations, COFO, was established in February 1962, by Bob Moses in Mississippi.  The group organized and served as a coordinating agency that would unite the various civil rights organizations, working independently in Mississippi.

Coming Soon.....
 
Congress of Racial Equality - CORE

The Congress of Racial Equality, CORE, was founded in 1942 by a group of students in Chicago, IL.  Members were mainly pacifists who had believed deeply in nonviolent civil disobedience.  The organization was convinced that nonviolent civil disobedience methods could be employed by African Americans to obtain their civil rights in America

CORE Flyer - Anti-Presidential Candidate Barry Goldwater - 1964
CORE Pamphlet - Cracking the Color Line - 1960s
 
James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner
Ramparts Mag. Miss Eyewitness - Civil Rights Workers Murdered - 1964
The Telegraph-Herald - FBI Arrests 20 in Mississippi - Dec 4, 1964
 
 

Emmett Till

In August 1955, a fourteen year old boy named Emmett Till from Chicago, Illinois, went to visit his Uncle Moses Wright in Money, Mississippi. While in Money, Emmett went into the Bryant Grocery and Meat Market owned by Roy and Carolyn Bryant to buy some candy.  According to witnesses, Emmett whistled at Carolyn Bryant. 

On August 28, 1955, at 2:30 a.m., two men came to the home of Moses Wright, Emmett's uncle. Roy Bryant, the owner of the grocery store, and J.W. Milam, Bryant's brother-in-law, kidnapped Emmett.  On August 31st, Emmett Till's body was found in the Tallahatchie River. One eye was gouged out, and his crushed head had a bullet in it. The corpse was nearly unrecognizable.   Moses Wright could only positively identify the body as Emmett's because it was wearing an initialed ring, of his father.

The Emmett Till case rapidly garnered  national attention. Mamie Bradley, Emmett's mother, insisted on an open-casket funeral, so that "all the world could see what they did to Emmett." Over four days, thousands of people witness Emmett's mangled body. Many more blacks and whites across the country who might not have otherwise heard of the case were shocked by pictures that appeared in Jet magazine. (Reference Artifacts)

On September 6, 1955, a grand jury in Mississippi indicted Roy Bryant and J.W. Milam for the kidnapping and murder of Emmett Till. Both men pleaded not guilty.  On September 19, the kidnapping and murder trial opened in Sumner, Mississippi.   On September 23, 1955, after the jury deliberated for just over an hour, they rendered their verdict  "not guilty." 

Booklet - "Behind the Lynching of Emmet Louis Till" - By Louis Burnham - 1955
Clarkdale, MS, Press - Riddle of Missing Witnesses Clears - Oct 1, 1955
Clarksdale, MS, Press - NAACP Denies Holding Mississippians - Oct 6, 1955
Clarksdale, MS, Press - Chicago Newspaper Disputes Charge  - Oct 7, 1955
Clarksdale, MS, Press - Mose Wright Afraid to Return Home - Oct 8, 1955
Jet Mag. - National Report - Sep 12, 1955
Jet Mag. - Will Mississippi  "Whitewash" the Emmett Till Killing - Sep 22, 1955
Jet Mag. - Where is Third Man in Till Lynching - Sep 29, 1955
Jet Mag. -  The Strange Trial of the Till Kidnapers - Oct 6, 1955
Jet Mag. - What the Public Didn't Know About the Till Trial - Oct 13, 1955
Jet Mag. - How the Till Case Changed 5 Lives - Nov 24, 1955
Jet Mag. - Special Report Mississippi - Jul 23, 1964
The Afro-American - 3rd Lynching of Year Shocks Nation - Sep 10, 1955
New Challenge - The Magazine for Young Americans - Nov 1955
Look Magazine - Approved Killing in Mississippi - Jan 24, 1956
Look Magazine - What's Happen to the Emmett Till  Killers? - Jan 22, 1957
 
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
AP Wire Photo - March on Washington - Savannah, GA - Marchers - 1963
AP Wire Photo - March on Washington - Madison, WS - Marchers - 1963
AP Wire Photo - Dr. King Jr. - U.S. Senate Passes Civil Rights Bill - 1964
UPI Wire Photo - Dr. King Jr. - Funeral Home - Memphis, TN - Apr 5, 1968
Washington Post - King Assassinated - Apr 5, 6, 1968
Chicago Sun-Times - Martin Luther King Slain - Apr 5, 1968
AP Wire Photo - Atlanta, Georgia - Dr. King Jr. Funeral - Apr 9, 1968
Vintage Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Pin
Memorial Magazine - Dr. Martin Luther King - 1968
Dr King's Assassin James Earl Ray - Free James Earl Ray Button - 1970's
 

Medgar Evers

Life Magazine - Funeral Service for Medgar Evers - Jun 28, 1963
NAACP - Medgar Evers - Mississippi - Membership_App. - 1964
 
 

Black Colleges & Colored Schools

 

Documents

The collection contains over 800-original documents.  The documents are dated between the late 1700s to mid 1800s.   As space permits, more documents will be added weekly.

 

 

Folk Art

    The collection contains various pieces of folk art.  The artifacts are circa 1900s - 1930s.

 

 

Furniture

   The collection contains 4-chairs are circa 1850s.  The Chairs are from Coastal Georgia.

 

 

Grave Markers

According to various scholars, these markers contain Congolese religious symbols.  The bursting sun, which is on Grave Marker one and two, represents the rejuvenation of life.  On Marker 2, the box inside the bursting sun represents the birth of man or the sun rising from the east, the beginning of life.  The second corner represents one's life on earth.  The third corner represents the sun setting, or one's life is ending in death on earth.  The fourth corner represents one's life in the afterworld, preparing to be reborn or the rejuvenation of life.  The shiny appearance on markers one, two, and three is what is termed as a "salt glaze."  The markers are from the Savannah, GA. area.  The markers are dated circa mid 1800's.

 

Grave Marker - #1 Grave Marker - #2 Grave Marker - #3 Grave Marker - #4

 

Gullah Culture

Info. By: Dr. Grey Gundaker - Associate Professor of American Studies & Anthropology; College of William & Mary

The culture of the Gullah people of the Sea Islands of South Carolina and Georgia emerged in the crucible of the Transatlantic Slave Trade when Africans were shipped into permanent bondage, some via the West Indies, and others directly from Africa during the 17th to mid-19th centuries.  Although, the term "Gullah" has often been associated with Angola, and later shipments to the Carolinas did include numerous Central Africans, a perhaps stronger and longer link exists with Senegambian groups such as the Mende and Gola.  Because peoples of this region were expert in the cultivation of both rice and cotton, they were highly desirable workers.  Indeed, the preference of  African captives in the late eighteenth and early eighteenth centuries for rice in their own diets, which they grew in small plots and marginal tidal swamps on their own (meager) time, may have first alerted planters that this crop had potential cash value on a large scale.  Before and after the Civil War, African descended people formed the majority of residents on the Sea Islands' indigo, rice, and cotton plantations. But after the war, the plantation system collapsed, most whites moved elsewhere, and Gullah acquired their own land, further developing local community and religious institutions such as the Prays/Praise House, home of the Shout tradition.

In addition to agricultural skills, the Gullah excelled in the art of sea grass basket making, using a coiled technique they brought from Africa.  Also great storytellers, preachers, and singers, their language, Gullah, is the one of, if not the, oldest surviving Creole, (a new language woven together from previously disparate ones), in the United States.  Because of its earlier suppression by teachers and outsiders as so-called "broken" English, Gullah people learned to be circumspect  about using it around strangers and, indeed, remain cautious to this day, especially as gated communities and golf resorts threaten what remains of their land.

 

Bone Carved Skull - 1 - 1900s Bone Carved Skull - 1 (Diff View)
Bone Carved Skull - 2 - 1900s Bone Carved Skull - 2 (Diff View)
Bone Carved Skull - 3 - 1900s Bone Carved Skull - 3 (Diff View)
Carved Animal Skull  - 1900s Hand Forged Lead Dice
Root Doctor's Healing Doll - 1900s Root Doctor's Healing Doll - (Diff View)
 Children's Doll - 1940s  Children's Doll (Diff View)
Gullah Clay Head 1930s Gullah Carved Alligator 1900s
Gullah Clay Jug 1930s Gullah Clay Jug 1930s
Gullah - Root Doctor's Walking Cain - Gullah Rituals Symbols - 1920s
Gullah - Root Doctor's Walking Cain - Gullah Rituals Symbols-1920s (Diff View)
Gullah - Root Doctor's Cain - Gullah Rituals Symbols-1920s (Diff View)
 
 
Lynching Artifacts

The museum will be adding additional artifacts, from it's lynching collection, over the next few months.  These photographs, postcards and newspapers contain original photographic images, as well as stories which are graphic and gruesome in nature.

Periodicals
Current History Illustrated - Lynching, America's National Disgrace - Jan 1924
Current History Illustrated - Jan 1924 (Different View)
The Commonweal Magazine - Can Law Stop Lynching? - Dec 29, 1933
The Commonweal Magazine - Dec 29, 1933 - (Different View)
Newspapers
News articles will expand for easy reading.  Place cursor on article for expansion.
Saint John Globe - Lynchers Let Loose, Five Negroes Hanged - Feb 25, 1881
The Daily Telegraph - Negro Hung on a Bridge - May 3, 1892
Buttons
NAACP Pinback - "Stop Lynching" Legal Defense Fund - 1930s
NAACP Pinback - "Stop Lynching - Build Democracy" - 1930s
Photographs & Postcards
A.P. Glover, Photographer - Tom Shipp & Abe Smith Lynched - Marion, IN - Aug 7, 1930
 
 
Manillas - West African Trade Bracelets

During the late 1400s, European Slave Traders observed that copper bracelets were used as a form of currency along the west coast of Africa.  The Portuguese contracted with manufacturers in Antwerp, Belgium, and elsewhere, to produce crescent shaped rings with flared ends of wearable size.  According to various scholars, the Spanish word manilla is derived from the Latin word MANUS (hand) and from MONILIA, plural of MONILE (necklace).  Other scholars believe the name manilha (manilla) originated from the Portuguese language meaning MAHO (hand) and ANILHO (ring).  Overtime, manillas became one of the principal money sources for the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Manillas were manufactured in Antwerp, Belgium, Birmingham and Bristol, England and probably in Nantes, France.  The manilla ceased to be legal tender in British West Africa on April 1, 1949. 

Information & Manillas by: Scott Semans.               Size and Weight of Manillas are on Average.

Unknown Manillas - Probably British
The unknown heavy manillas have different displayed characteristics in regards to their flared ends and weight.
Heavy Manilla - #1 - (Unknown/Poss Onoudo?) Size Across: Approx. 85mm - Weight: 120-150gm - 18th Century
Heavy Manilla - #2 - (Unknown/Poss Onoudu?) Size Across: Approx. 85mm - Weight: 161-225gm - 18th Century
Heavy Manilla - #3 - (Unknown/Poss Onoudo?) Size Across: 81-85mm - Weight: 142-185gm - 18th Century
British Manillas - Early Manillas
British Manilla (Unknown/Poss Okpoho?) Size Across: Approx. 85mm - Weight: 75-100gm - 18th Century
British Manilla (Unknown) Size Across: Approx. 85mm - Weight: 75-100gm - 18th Century
British Manillas - Medium Size - Intermediate Period Manillas
British Manilla (Unknown/Poss Abi?) Size Across: Approx. Varied - Weight: Varied - Probably 18th Century
British Manilla (Unknown/Poss Ejema?) Size Across: Approx. Varied - Weight: Varied - Probably 18th Century
British Manilla (Unknown?) Size Across: Approx. Varied - Weight: Varied - Probably 18th Century
British Manillas - Late Manillas
British Manilla (Unknown/Poss Atoni?) Size Across: Approx. 53-59mm - Weight: 69-88gm - Probably 19th Century    This style of manilla, (Poss Atoni?),  was recovered from the English Schooner DUORO, which sank off the Isles of Scilly, Cornwall, England, in 1843 on its supposed journey, (speculation only),  to Africa.
British Manilla (Unknown/Poss Okombo?) Size Across: Approx 54-55mm - Weight: 59-71gm - Probably 19th Century
British Manilla (Unknown) Size Across: Approx. 52-56mm - Weight: 54-66gm - Probably 19th Century
French Manillas
French Manilla (Popo Prototype? - Oval End) Size Across: Approx 96mm - Weight 255-260gm - Probably 18th Century
French Manilla (Popo Round End) Size Across: Approx. 79-85mm - Weight: 120-132gm - 18th & 19th Century
French Manilla (Popo Rim End) Size Across: Approx. 79-85mm - Weight: 120-132gm - 18th & 19th Century
French Manilla (Popo Square End) Size Across: Approx. 79-85mm - Weight: 120-132gm - 18th & 19th Century
French Manillas - Group Photograph - Popo Oval, Popo Round, Popo Rim, Popo Square
 
 

Miscellaneous Artifacts 

 

Musical Instruments

The collection contains 1-Diddleybo and 12-Tambourines. The Diddleybo is from the Fort Hill area in Macon, Georgia.  The tambourines are from St Mary's Island, GA.  The artifacts are dated circa 1920s. 

 

 

Personal Effects

The collection contains 1-pair of male, 3-pairs of female, and 1-pair of children's Negro  shoes.   The shoes are dated circa mid 1800s.   The shoes are from Virginia, Georgia, and South Carolina.

 

 

Photographs 

The collection contains numerous photographic images.   Ambrotypes, Tintypes, CDVs, Matted Photographs, Cabinet Cards and Stereoscopic photographic cards are available for viewing.  Additional photographs will be added as space permits. The photographs are dated circa mid 1800s to 1920s.

 

Ambrotypes

 

 

Tintypes

Children/Young Adults

Families

Men

Misc.

Nanny

Women

Photographs (CDVs)

Photographs (Matted)

 

Postcards

The collection contains over 5,500 postcards. The cards are dated from 1890s to 1940s.

 

 

Quilts & Mattress

The collection contains various quilts from Social Circle and St. Mary's Island, Ga.  The quilts are dated circa late 1800s to the early 1920s.

 

 

Spirit Coins

The collection contains 587-spirit coins from St. Simons Island, Ga.  The coins are United States, French, Spanish, Portuguese and English currency.  The coins are dated from the late 1700s to mid 1800s.   Spirit coins were worn by enslaved Africans around the neck and ankle to ward off conjured spirits and illnesses.  Pierced coins played an important role in African American folklore and spirituality.

 

 

Spirit Jugs

The collection contains 2 spirit jugs. The jugs are circa 1930s.

Spirit Jug1 Spirit Jug1 (Diff. View) Spirit Jug1 (Diff. View)
     
 

Trade Beads

The collection contains various types of trade beads that were made during the time period of the African Slave Trade.  The majority of  trade beads were made in Venice, Holland, Bohemia, (known today as Czechoslovakia), and Germany.  European glass  beads were traded primarily in West Africa for human cargo, gold and ivory.  The collection's trade beads are dated: Circa Late 1500s - 1800s.

Left column whole strand. Right column close-up view of beads.
Excavated Beads - European Glass Trade Beads from Mali, Africa

Venetian Glass Beads - Mali Africa-16th-17th Century

Venetian Glass Beads - (Diff View)

Venetian Glass Beads - Mali Africa-16th-17th Century

Venetian Glass Beads - (Diff View)

Venetian Glass Beads - Mali Africa-16th -17th Century

Venetian Glass Beads - (Diff View)

Venetian Glass Beads - Mali Africa-16th -17th Century

Venetian Glass Beads - (Diff View)

Venetian Glass Beads (Probably?)-Mali Africa-16th -17th Cent

Venetian Glass Beads - (Diff View)

European Glass Trade Beads

European Glass Beads - Cobalt Blue - -Late-17th Century

European Glass Beads - Cobalt Blue (Diff View)

Venetian Glass Beads - Striped Green-Heart  - 18th Century

Venetian Green-Heart Glass Beads - (Diff View)

European Glass Beads - Clear - 18th Century

European Glass Beads - (Diff View)

European Glass Beads - Cobalt Blue - Mid-18th Century

European Glass Beads - Cobalt Blue  (Diff. View)

Venetian Glass Beads - Large Wound  - Mid-19th Century

Venetian Glass Beads - Large Wound  - (Diff View)

European Glass Beads - Clear - Mid-19th Century

European Glass Beads - Clear  (Diff. View)

European Glass Beads - Porcelain - Mid-19th Century

European Glass Beads - Porcelain  (Diff View)

Venetian Glass Beads - Gooseberry - Mid-19th Century

Venetian Glass Beads - Gooseberry  (Diff. View)

Venetian Glass Beads - Gooseberry - Late-19th Century

Venetian Glass Beads - Gooseberry - (Diff View)

Venetian Glass Beads - Late-19th Century

Venetian Glass Beads (Diff View)

 

Transportation & Torture Artifacts

Branding Irons

The collection contains various branding irons from South Carolina & Georgia.  The branding irons are dated circa mid 1800s. 

 

Whips

The collection contains various styles of whips from Georgia.  The artifacts are dated circa mid 1800s. 

 

Fetters

The collection contains various types of ankle fetters.  The two pictured, represent the style and sizes that are in the collection.

   
Ankle Fetters Large Pods #1 Ankle Fetters Large #1 (Diff View)
Ankle Fetters Small Pods #2 Ankle Fetters Small #2 (Diff View)

Shackles

The collection contains various types of shackles.  The three pictured, represent the style and sizes that are in the collection.

   
Ankle Shackles #1 Ankle Shackles #2
Ankle Shackles #3  
     
     
 

Trading Cards

Trading Cards were designed and used as a form of product advertisement by companies.  Companies would place a graphic image on the front side of the card that would display its product.  On the backside of the card, information was provided to explain what the company's product entailed.  However, during the late 1800s, numerous companies would display a graphic image of an African American with exaggerated physical characteristics on the front side of the card.  Middle Passage Museum believes that the explanation behind these types of derogatory images was to attract, or gain the attention of  "White America" during the era of "Jim Crow"

 

Victorian Trading Card - Sanford’s Ginger  Potter Drug & Chemical Co., Boston - Circa 1890s

Trading Card - Glenwood/Elmwood Rangers/Parlor Stove - Circa 1890s

Trading Card - "Ariosa" Coffee Company - "Comfort for One" - Circa 1890s
   
   

Slave Utilitarian Tools

95-Gallon Sand Cast Syrup Kettle 95-Gallon Sand Cast (Diff. View)
Field Canteen Field Canteen (Diff. View)
Flax Straightner Pitch Fork
Plantation Field Plow Plantation Field Plow (Diff. View)
Plantation Copper Funnel Plantation Rice Field Noise Maker
Seed Shovel Seed Shovel (Diff. View)
Slave Quarter Utensils Slave Quarter Ladle
Slave Quarter Serving Spoon Slave Quarter Serving Spoon (Diff. View)
Slave Quarter Butter Scoop(1) Slave Quarter Butter Scoop(2)
Group Utensils Cotton Basket
Shuck Mop Shuck Mop (Diff. View)
Dough Bowls Dough Bowls
Hand Forged Iron Tools Hand Forged Iron Tools (Diff. View)
Hand Forged Iron Tools (Diff. View) Hand Forged Iron Tools (Diff. View)
Rice Pounder Rice Pounder (Diff. View)
Rice Pounder (Diff.View) Rice Pounder (Diff. View)
Sugar Cane Back Pack Sugar Cane Back Pack (Diff. View)
Sugar Cane Back Pack (Diff. View) Slave Quarter Hand Forged Copper Pot
Slave Quarter Forged Copper Pot (Diff View) Slave Quarter Forged Copper Pot (Diff View)

 

Sharecropper Tools